How to remember what fruits & vegetables you have?

Fruit Hanging Baskets

It is essential to plan your food consumption according to the size hold. Separating certain fruits and vegetables is very important. A well-ventilated place for them is crucial. For example, onions and potatoes don't go inside the refrigerator. They like dark spots like your pantry if you have space. Another essential trick is to keep them separated: the onion will rot the potatoes if left close to each other. Garlic is safe being close to onions; remember to leave the peel until you use them.

 

What about your Fruits? I found these beautiful hanging baskets with a rail for you to mount them on the wall. Having them at a glance reminds you to eat them. People say that's not a good idea because the fruit will spoil. They will if you don't eat them, that is why you need to buy what you want and think you will eat within a week. Keep Apples separately because they will ripen other fruit faster. However, you can use this to your advantage if you need other fruit to ripen! The trick is to eat your fruits as fresh as possible, so don't overbuy them, and. remember they are vital for you to eat.

Remember that the amount of produce you buy should go according to what you usually use. I.  for example, buy a lot of tomatoes and keep them in one of my hanging baskets but if I don’t use them as soon as I planned, I blend them with some onions, garlic, a little piece of cilantro, salt and vintager. How much of all? Enough for it to have a good taste. In a kitchen, cooks learn by tasting the food. Put your mixture in an airtight jar and you’ll have a fresh tomato sauce ready to use. Try and use it in your next meal, like in a chicken soup, meatballs or any dish you like. The trick is to use all you have as soon as possible.

 

 Another tip for keeping your fruits and vegetables in these baskets is like the old saying, "One bad apple spoils the bunch"; that applies to all. So as soon as you see something going bad, remove it and wash the basket to avoid contamination.

 

Practice makes perfect!

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